Heal2020

Main tracks and topics

Early Identification of Hearing Loss (screening and diagnosis)

Intervention and Rehabilitation (strategies and technologies)

Hearing Loss: Mechanisms, Effects and Medical Issues

Epidemiology of Hearing Loss

Auditory Perception
Auditory Processing Disorders
Cognitive Decline and Dementia in relation to hearing loss

Listening effort and fatigue
Amplification: technologies and strategies
Cochlear Implants: state-of-the-art
Speech Perception/Speech Development

Genetic Issues

Auditory Neuropathy

e-Health and m-Health

Etiology and Medical Issues

Family Empowerment

Family Perspectives


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Special Session

SPEECH-IN-NOISE TESTING WITH DIGITS IN NOISE

Organized by Cas Smits (Amsterdam)

The DIN test (or DTT test) has become very popular test during the last decade. Initially developed as a self-test for hearing screening, it has proven to be a valid test in the clinic, for school screening and also as a standard test in audiological research. The aim of the speakers in this session is to provide the audience an overview of studies with digits in noise testing.

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Symposium

SENSITIVE NEW METHODS FOR MEASURING HEARING IN INFANTS, CHILDREN AND ADULTS

Organizers: David Moore and Lisa Hunter (Cincinnati, Ohio, USA)


It is now well-recognized that the audiogram doesn’t capture a lot of cases of hearing impairment (HI). This ‘hidden hearing loss’ includes, first, ‘sub-clinical hearing loss’, reflected in pure tone thresholds < 20 dB, extended high frequency (> 8 kHz) threshold elevation, or impaired supra-threshold hearing. Second, impaired spectrotemporal perception accounts for “40% of the variance in speech intelligibility, beyond the 40% accounted for by the [audiogram]” in HI (Bernstein et al., JAAA, 2013), mainly due to impaired coding of temporal fine structure (TFS) that could have its origins in both the cochlea and in the central auditory system. Third, cognitive function is undoubtedly important. Memory, attention and language certainly modulate auditory cortical processing and may also influence bottom-up HI via the auditory system’s abundant efferent pathways. Discovery of these phenomena has been based in large part on new, sensitized measures of hearing and speech perception. In this symposium, we explore examples of peripheral and central measures, focusing mainly on infants and children. Translation to clinical issues has revealed potential new solutions to fundamental problems that have puzzled both clinicians and scientists for years.

Speakers:

Yvonne Sininger (USA), New sensitive technology for auditory threshold measures in infants.

Lisa Hunter (USA), Advancements to accurately diagnose hearing loss type and degree at birth – UNHS Rebooted.

Gabriella Musacchia (USA), Early identification of suprathreshold auditory deficits in infants and children.

Lorna Halliday (UK), Auditory perceptual predictors of language outcomes in children with hearing loss.

David Moore (USA), Resting state fMRI shows specific speech processing impairments in children with normal audiograms.

Lina Motlagh-Zadeh (USA), Extended high frequency hearing enhances speech perception in noise.

 

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Special Session

WHICH CASES NEED WHICH TESTS? ANSWERS FROM LARGE-SAMPLE EVIDENCE VERSUS TRADITION OR PERSONAL WHIM

Adrian Davis (UK), Mark Haggard (UK), Snezana Filipovic (Malta).

Most of the world’s population faces extreme obstacles in accessing any paediatric audiological expertise at all, so the past professional and commercial incentives to just perform lots of tests are perverse. Screening (i.e. case-finding in asymptomatic cases and its consequences) may be affordable, but only if its opposite (triage) is also used to achieve proportionate response within the larger caseload of symptomatic cases. As healthcare demand is unlimited, the responsiveness of the care system depends on efficient patient flow, hence on applying reliable evidence on surrogate outcomes in assessment as well as on ultimate outcomes from treatment. (This session could include submissions on the same line of thought, also on adults)

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Lecture
HEARING FOR LIFE: THE 2020 WHO WORLD REPORT ON HEARING

George Tavartkiladze (Russia) will present the World Report on Hearing which was developed during last two years after the adoption of new WHO Resolution on Hearing. The Report on Hearing will be launched by the May 2020 WHO World Health Assembly (the decision-making body of WHO).

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Round Table and Special Session organised by the European APD Group and EFAS APD Working Group
AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDERS

Moderator: Vasiliki (Vivian) Iliadou (Thessaloniki, Greece)

Round Table discussion on hearing and auditory processing in the clinical audiology practice. Panelists: Doris-Eva Bamiou (UK), Helen Grech (Malta), Tone Stokkereit Mattsson (Norway), Martin Ptok (Germany), Hung Thai-Van (France).

Presentations:

Questionnaires on Hearing & APD, Martin Ptok

APD Clinical battery a gold standard approach, Tone Stokkereit Mattsson

Cognitive and linguistic interactions in APD, Helen Grech

Objective tests for APD, Hung Thai-Van

Clinical presentation of APD in different paediatric and adult populations, Doris-Eva Bamiou

Final discussion with attendees.

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Special Session 

MAKE LISTENING SAFE

Organized by the WHO World Hearing Forum

Moderator: Mark Laureyns (Milan, Italy) and Shelly Chadha (WHO)

This session will cover research, standards, guidelines and actions to promote safe listening.  The World Hearing Forum has been established by WHO, as a global network of stakeholders promoting ear and hearing care worldwide. In this special session, you will discover the new WHO-ITU standard on Safe Listening Devices and Systems, the new ITU Safe Listening Standard for Personal Amplifiers, studies on the effectivity and the user experience of personal hearing protection, promotion campaigns to promote safe listening to young target groups, national legislations to prevent sound induced hearing loss and much more.  We also invite research groups to come and present their latest work related to safe listening.

                                                                                                                                        Last update: 18 November 2019